Multiple purple and pink renditions of stem cells appear as spherical clusters enveloped in translucent bubbles
Mammalian Embryos Might Not Need Primitive Streaks After All
The primitive streak, a structure that emerges during mammalian and avian gastrulation, might be a byproduct rather than a landmark of the embryonic development process.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ANUSORN NAKDEE
Mammalian Embryos Might Not Need Primitive Streaks After All
Mammalian Embryos Might Not Need Primitive Streaks After All

The primitive streak, a structure that emerges during mammalian and avian gastrulation, might be a byproduct rather than a landmark of the embryonic development process.

The primitive streak, a structure that emerges during mammalian and avian gastrulation, might be a byproduct rather than a landmark of the embryonic development process.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ANUSORN NAKDEE
News
An illustration shows circular red blood cells running into a yellow cholesterol blockage in a transverse section of an artery on a blue and purple background
Genetic Variant Discovered in Amish Protects from Heart Disease
Abby Olena | Dec 2, 2021
Researchers link a missense mutation in the B4GALT1 gene to lower levels of LDL cholesterol and the blood clotting factor fibrinogen.
Scanning electron micrograph showing cancer cell attached to T call via nanotube
Cancer Cell Nanotubes Hijack Mitochondria from Immune Sentinels
Sophie Fessl | Nov 30, 2021
The mitochondria stolen via these tiny connections give tumor cells a metabolic boost while the T cells are left weakened, according to in vitro experiments.
small, circular bones individually labeled and packaged in plastic bags
2,000-Year-Old Salmon DNA Reveals Secret to Sustainable Fisheries
Dan Robitzski | Nov 29, 2021
Genomic analysis of ancient chum salmon bones and cultural knowledge from the Tsleil-Waututh Nation suggest that people in the Pacific Northwest managed fisheries for thousands of years by harvesting males and releasing females.
fingertips with pills on them
Over the Counter Antihistamines Could Help Against Cancer
Alejandra Manjarrez | Nov 24, 2021
The binding of histamine with one of its receptors within the tumor environment makes cancer cells more resistant to immunotherapy, according to a new study. Blocking that binding could improve responses to treatment.
group of people
HHMI Kickstarts $2 Billion Initiative to Boost Diversity in STEM
Chloe Tenn | Nov 23, 2021
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute will invest the funds over 10 years across all stages of the STEM pipeline.
A grid of images showing different cross sections of a human brain MRI.
Study Links Flu to Increased Parkinson’s Risk a Decade Later
Dan Robitzski | Nov 19, 2021
Epidemiological research suggests that a flu diagnosis might be one factor in the eventual onset of the neurodegenerative disease, but experts say it doesn’t prove a causal relationship.
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella bacteria in intestinal tissue
Gut Infections Help Shield Intestinal Neurons from Future Damage
Annie Melchor | Nov 19, 2021
In mice, a kind of immune memory appears to protect the cells against future harm, a finding that could provide insight into treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and other inflammatory digestive conditions.
black-legged deer tick waits on leaf for host to feed on
A Lab-Stage mRNA Vaccine Targeting Ticks May Offer Protection Against Lyme and Other Tick-Borne Diseases
Andaleeb Sajid | Nov 18, 2021
NIH researcher Andaleeb Sajid discusses her study’s finding that ticks were unable to feed on vaccinated guinea pigs, preventing transmission of the pathogen that causes Lyme disease.
illustration of a broken DNA strand
DNA Damage Makes Zebrafish Sleepy
Sophie Fessl | Nov 18, 2021
Buildup of a DNA-repair protein in brain cells spurs shut-eye in the fish, a study finds, and similar results in mice suggest the mechanism is widespread in animals.
Small group of Scimitar-horned oryx
Tool Identifies Likely Reservoir Species for SARS-CoV-2
Emma Yasinski | Nov 16, 2021
Researchers used sequencing data and phenotypic traits to predict which of 5,400 species were most likely to be susceptible to contracting and spreading the virus back to humans.
spider jumping while making silk
Webless Jumping Spiders Spin Super Strong Silk
Chloe Tenn | Nov 12, 2021
The silk draglines made by zebra jumping spiders are tougher than the silk webbing of orb weaver spiders, even though they’re made at 25 to 35 times the speed.
Artist's impression of the human microbiome
Diet Implicated in Autism-Microbiome Link
Ruth Williams | Nov 11, 2021
The unbalanced gut flora present in some people with autism is not a driver of the condition but rather a consequence of eating behaviors characteristic of the condition, a new study claims.
Man in a white shirt and a large backpack stands on a hill overlooking dense forest
Public Health Pioneer Peter Pharoah Dies at 87
Dan Robitzski | Nov 11, 2021
Pharoah’s work ended endemic cretinism in a remote region of Papua New Guinea and contributed to the understanding of myriad other perinatal health conditions.
illustration of blue coronavirus particles with snowflakes in the background
Is COVID-19 Seasonal?
Alejandra Manjarrez | Nov 10, 2021
While the weather isn’t currently the dominant factor driving SARS-CoV-2 transmission, experts say that in the future COVID-19 may become a disease of winter.
Artist’s rendering of the protein synthesis process, in which a tRNA molecules carry amino acids to a ribosome that’s decoding a strand of mRNA.
Screen of 250,000 Species Reveals Tweaks to Genetic Code
Dan Robitzski | Nov 9, 2021
A massive screen of bacterial and archaeal genomes revealed five previously unknown instances where an organism uses an alternate code to translate genetic blueprints into proteins.
Image of the tissue surrounding a pancreatic tumor thickening and scarring.
How Pancreas Injuries Can Cause Cancer in Mice
Dan Robitzski | Nov 9, 2021
A key mutation turns healing cells into cancer promoters.
Fossils of African Fauna
African, Arabian Mammals Didn’t Escape Grande Coupure Extinction
Chloe Tenn | Nov 8, 2021
More than two-thirds of mammals in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula went extinct during the Eocene-Oligocene transition some 30 million years ago, a study finds.
Isolated Realistic Coronavirus Covid-19 Molecule in a Biological Environment stock photo
Tweak to N Protein Makes Delta Variant More Infectious
Chloe Tenn | Nov 5, 2021
Using a novel lab technique, researchers identified a mutation that allows the virus to insert more genetic material into host cells.
Lizard on glass tank
Engineered Stem Cells Grant Geckos “Perfectly” Regenerated Tails
Chloe Tenn | Nov 5, 2021
Geckos injected with neural stem cells modified to block cartilage growth developed the skeletal and nervous components normally lacking from regrown tails.