Grey and white stones balancing on a wooden plank
Eight Weeks of Meditation Doesn’t Change the Brain, Study Finds
Study finds that, contrary to what other research has found, a popular meditation course does not appear to alter brain structure.
ABOVE: © iStock.com, nambitomo
Eight Weeks of Meditation Doesn’t Change the Brain, Study Finds
Eight Weeks of Meditation Doesn’t Change the Brain, Study Finds

Study finds that, contrary to what other research has found, a popular meditation course does not appear to alter brain structure.

Study finds that, contrary to what other research has found, a popular meditation course does not appear to alter brain structure.

ABOVE: © iStock.com, nambitomo

News

Open orange pill bottle with rounded white pills
What’s the Evidence for Fluvoxamine in COVID-19? 
Catherine Offord | May 20, 2022
The US FDA’s decision not to grant an emergency use authorization for the antidepressant as a COVID-19 treatment highlights a lack of consensus among researchers about how to interpret clinical data on the drug.
Two adult bottlenose dolphins and one calf swim close to a sandy seafloor that’s dotted with coral.
Study Suggests Dolphins Use Coral Mucus as Medicine
Dan Robitzski | May 19, 2022
Researchers observe that dolphins in a pod in the Red Sea regularly rub against certain corals and sponges, perhaps to sooth their skin by prompting the invertebrates to release mucus that contains antimicrobial compounds.
illustration of purple mitochondrion within a cell
Rogue Mitochondria Turn Hermaphroditic Snails Female: Study
Patience Asanga | May 19, 2022
The accidental finding marks the first time a phenomenon called cytoplasmic sterility, known to occur in plants, has been found in animals.
A clinician (off screen) wearing blue gloves presses a diapered infant’s heel against a paper card to collect blood samples.
Did Researchers Really Uncover the Cause of SIDS?
Dan Robitzski | May 18, 2022
An interesting but preliminary biomarker study’s reception illustrates the challenges of conducting and communicating nuanced research in the era of social media.
A drawing of pseudostratified gut epithelial cells in the early intestines, cells in red and nucleus in purple.
Move Over Apoptosis: Another Form of Cell Death May Occur in the Gut
Natalia Mesa | May 18, 2022
Though scientists don’t yet know much about it, a newly described process called erebosis might have profound implications for how the gut maintains itself.
Group of cells stained in either blue or green in a black background.
Diabetes Marker Linked to COVID-19 Severity in Mice
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 16, 2022
A sugar that’s less abundant in the blood of people with diabetes binds to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein and disrupts the virus’s ability to fuse with cells.  
a Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) resting on a reflective surface
Reshuffled Genomes May Explain Cephalopods’ Smarts
Sophie Fessl | May 13, 2022
In two related studies, researchers describe huge chromosomal rearrangements and about 500 novel gene clusters in the octopus, squid, and cuttlefish genomes, which they say could help explain how they evolved their extraordinary brains.
Senior woman wearing a grey pullover sitting on a bed and holding her back.
Early Inflammation Protects Against Chronic Pain, Study Finds
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 12, 2022
Human data and experiments in mice challenge the common use of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat pain.
close-up of an Aedes aegypti mosquito on human skin
Researchers Discover What Attracts Mosquitoes to Humans
Sophie Fessl | May 11, 2022
A brain area of Aedes aegypti responds specifically to components of human sebum, a study finds.
A colorized transmission electron microscope image of an oligodendrocyte (blue) surrounded by cells that it coated in myelin (red outlines).
Brain Fluid from Youngsters Gives Old Mice a Memory Boost
Dan Robitzski | May 11, 2022
A growth factor found in the cerebrospinal fluid of young mice triggered the proliferation of myelin-making cells when injected into the brains of older mice.
Tiliqua rugosa, sleepy lizard, on reddish soil in western Australia
Researchers Probe Genetics Behind a Lizard’s Odd Immune System
Hannah Thomasy | May 10, 2022
Deletions in the sleepy lizard genome leave it without an important type of T cells found in most other vertebrates.
Metal shelves densely packed with preserved tissue specimens of various sizes, all suspended in glass containers.
Evolution of 1918 Flu Virus Traced from Century-Old Samples
Dan Robitzski | May 10, 2022
The work reveals that the pandemic flu was likely the direct predecessor of the seasonal H1N1 flu that circulated for decades.
stained microscope image of a germinal center inside a lymph node
Booster Is Best in the Same Limb as Initial Vaccine: Mouse Study
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 6, 2022
Compared to mice who got the doses in separate limbs, animals receiving flu shots in the same paw for both a first and second dose had better-trained memory B cells that bound tighter to the vaccine antigen.
Miami skyline of skyscrapers next to ocean
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
Natalia Mesa | May 5, 2022
Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.
Person taking antibiotic pill
What Happens to the Gut Microbiome After Taking Antibiotics?
Sophie Fessl | May 5, 2022
Studies are finding that a single course of antibiotics alters the gut microbiomes of healthy volunteers—and that it can take months or even years to recover the original species composition.
Brick building with two palms in front and fountain
Florida Faculty Await Details on New Tenure Law
Natalia Mesa | May 4, 2022
Professors in the Sunshine State may soon face an additional tenure review process under the bill, but not much is yet known about how it will change tenure retention.
hands of a person checking their blood glucose level with a monitor
Growing Evidence Ties COVID-19 to Diabetes Risk
Bianca Nogrady | May 3, 2022
Studies suggest SARS-CoV-2 infection could trigger the development of diabetes in some people, even those with no other risk factors.
A top-down view of bowls filled various high-fiber foods such as rice, corn, seeds, and cereal sitting on a wooden table.
Different Dietary Fibers Affect the Body in Unique Ways
Rachael Moeller Gorman | May 3, 2022
Acting through the microbiome, the fiber arabinoxylan reduces cholesterol in many people, while another fiber, called long-chain inulin, increases inflammation, a study finds.
line illustration of DNA with single-strand break
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation
Sophie Fessl | Apr 28, 2022
Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.