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an image of a slice of a rat brain is colored red on a black background. a lime green human organoid sits in the top left of the brain
Human Brain Organoids Transplanted Into Rats Respond to Visual Stimuli
The organoids could one day be used to treat brain injuries in humans. 
Human Brain Organoids Transplanted Into Rats Respond to Visual Stimuli
Human Brain Organoids Transplanted Into Rats Respond to Visual Stimuli

The organoids could one day be used to treat brain injuries in humans. 

The organoids could one day be used to treat brain injuries in humans. 

News
Artist’s rendering of various orange and pink colored bacteria
Q&A: What if Immune Cells Don’t Actually Detect Viruses and Bacteria?
Dan Robitzski | Feb 3, 2023 | 10+ min read
The Scientist spoke with Jonathan Kagan about his idea that immune cells respond to “errors” made by unsuccessful pathogens, not the pathogens themselves.
The face of a young woman and the face of an old man surrounded by mechanical clocks.
Daily Gene Expression Rhythms Vary with Sex and Age: Study
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Feb 2, 2023 | 3 min read
By studying tissues from deceased people, a team found that women have more rhythmical gene expression and that this molecular rhythmicity decreases with age.
Illustration of DNA double helix with purple background.
Unbalanced Allele Expression Associated with Mutation, Disease
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Feb 2, 2023 | 5 min read
A study identifies nearly 3,000 genes where one allele tends to be expressed more than the other, but the findings ignited controversy in the field. 
Microscopy view of cancerous human cervix cells stained violet.
Why Some HPV Infections Carry More Cervical Cancer Risk
Dan Robitzski | Feb 2, 2023 | 5 min read
Where and how human papillomavirus integrates itself into the human genome steers the infection’s clinical outcomes, finds a large, multifaceted study.
a human neuron illuminated in bright green on a black background.
Mitochondrial Metabolism Dictates Neurons’ Growth Rate
Katherine Irving | Jan 30, 2023 | 4 min read
Altering the rate of respiration in mitochondria changes how fast neurons grow, making mouse neurons grow more like human ones and vice versa, a study finds.
A pair of prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster)
Monogamous Rodents Don’t Need “Love Molecule” To Pair Up
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 27, 2023 | 4 min read
Prairie voles lacking functional receptors for oxytocin form normal social bonds, a finding that could explain the hormone’s clinical failures.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm
Double Agents: Engineered Bacteria Tackle Pathogenic Biofilms in Mice
Katherine Irving | Jan 26, 2023 | 3 min read
Mycoplasma pneumoniae with pathogenic genes replaced by biofilm-degrading ones enhance survival in a mouse model of ventilator-associated pneumonia.
Closeup of a pair of hands in blue gloves holding a white mouse and injecting it with an amber colored liquid.
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms
Dan Robitzski | Jan 25, 2023 | 6 min read
A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.
Microscopy image with blue and red neurons, where red indicates neurons involved in a memory engram
Asthma Drug Helps Mice Retrieve Memories “Lost” to Sleep Deprivation
Zunnash Khan | Jan 24, 2023 | 4 min read
A study finds roflumilast can reverse sleep deprivation–induced amnesia in mice, hinting at pathways to treating memory loss in people.
a centrifuge from a birds-eye view, spinning quickly with a colored blur 
Scientists Use Centrifuge to Discover a Hormone
Katherine Irving | Jan 23, 2023 | 3 min read
A new method for isolating extracellular fluid aims to discover molecules with therapeutic potential that were previously obscured by highly abundant proteins.
a newly hatched mosquito sits on top of water, with its discarded cocoon floating below
In Vitro Malaria Sporozoite Production May Lead to Cheaper Vaccines
Katherine Irving | Jan 20, 2023 | 4 min read
A method for culturing the infectious stage of the Plasmodium lifecycle could increase malaria vaccine production efficiency by tenfold, study authors say.
A photo of a dish in which cells, which look like small dots, have been enlarged and stained to make them visible to the naked eye.
New Swelling Technique Makes Cells Visible to the Naked Eye
Kamal Nahas, PhD | Jan 19, 2023 | 4 min read
A new technique, called Unclearing Microscopy, physically inflates and then stains cells to circumvent the need for expensive microscopes.
three black mice lined up next to each other. the one on the left, fed a low-fat diet, has one small bald patch, the middle mouse, fed fish oil, has a large bald spot across its shoulders and back, and the right mouse, fed cocoa butter, has no baldness.
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds
Katherine Irving | Jan 19, 2023 | 3 min read
The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.
An artist’s rendering of a DNA-based virus trap, represented as gray rods in a short cone-shaped arrangement. One is coated with blue molecules, likely antibodies, that adhere to a virus target. Another image shows to traps coming together to capture a red coronavirus.
“Origami” DNA Traps Could Keep Large Viruses From Infecting Cells
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 18, 2023 | 4 min read
By engineering structures out of DNA, scientists could potentially prevent larger viruses, like coronaviruses and influenza viruses, from interacting with cells.
A green and white fish swimming underwater
Rockfish Genes Hold Clues to Human Longevity
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 12, 2023 | 3 min read
By analyzing the genomes of 23 remarkably long-lived fish species, a study found two metabolic pathways associated with longevity.
A younger-looking mouse next to an older-looking one
Epigenetic Manipulations Can Accelerate or Reverse Aging in Mice
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jan 12, 2023 | 4 min read
Repairing damaged DNA appears to drive aging by causing the loss of epigenetic information, but restoring that information reverses such effects, a study finds.
Artist’s rendition of a neuron silhouetted against a glowing red background.
SNO-y Protein Levels Help Explain Why More Women Develop Alzheimer’s
Dan Robitzski | Jan 6, 2023 | 4 min read
Female postmortem brains contain more S-nitrosylated C3 proteins, likely linked to menopause, which instruct immune cells to kill neuronal synapses.
A colored microscopy image of a dividing breast cancer cell
Transfer RNAs Have a Surprising Role in Breast Cancer Growth
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 5, 2023 | 4 min read
A particular leucine-ferrying tRNA is more abundant in cancerous cells than healthy ones, and lowering its levels inhibits cancer growth, a study finds.
Pink neutrophils on a white background.
Mucus-Eating Gut Bacteria May Promote Fever After Cancer Treatment
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jan 5, 2023 | 3 min read
The expansion of mucus-degraders in the mouse gut—possibly due to poor nutrition—thins the colon’s mucus layer and may weaken defenses against blood-infecting microbes.
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