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Two adult bottlenose dolphins and one calf swim close to a sandy seafloor that’s dotted with coral.
Study Suggests Dolphins Use Coral Mucus as Medicine
Researchers observe that dolphins in a pod in the Red Sea regularly rub against certain corals and sponges, perhaps to sooth their skin by prompting the invertebrates to release mucus that contains antimicrobial compounds.
Study Suggests Dolphins Use Coral Mucus as Medicine
Study Suggests Dolphins Use Coral Mucus as Medicine

Researchers observe that dolphins in a pod in the Red Sea regularly rub against certain corals and sponges, perhaps to sooth their skin by prompting the invertebrates to release mucus that contains antimicrobial compounds.

Researchers observe that dolphins in a pod in the Red Sea regularly rub against certain corals and sponges, perhaps to sooth their skin by prompting the invertebrates to release mucus that contains antimicrobial compounds.

antimicrobial
Virus Hunters: Searching for Therapeutic Phages in a Drug Resistant World
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Sep 21, 2020 | 1 min read
Researchers Jason Gill and Paul Turner will discuss their work on bacteriophage therapy to treat drug resistant bacterial infections.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast – Episode 3
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Mar 25, 2020 | 1 min read
Tackling Antibiotic Resistance: Viruses to the Rescue
Ants Produce Antibiotics that May Protect Plants
Emily Makowski | Mar 1, 2020 | 2 min read
The antimicrobial compounds ants excrete to defend themselves from pathogens may protect plants as well.
Will Komodo Dragons Yield the Next Blockbuster Antibiotic?
Jef Akst | May 1, 2017 | 4 min read
The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.
Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections
Edward D. Marks and Steven Smith | Apr 30, 2016 | 1 min read
Metal ions and materials with nanoscale patterns can kill even antibiotic-resistant pathogens. 
Holding Their Ground
Amanda B. Keener | Feb 1, 2016 | 10+ min read
To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.
Plant Immunity
Amanda B. Keener | Jan 31, 2016 | 1 min read
How plants fight off pathogens
Fat to the Rescue
Jenny Rood | Jan 5, 2015 | 2 min read
Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.
Shark Skin-Like Surface Fights MRSA
Jef Akst | Sep 17, 2014 | 1 min read
Surfaces covered in a micropattern mimicking the ridges of shark skin could reduce the spread of drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other superbugs in hospitals.
Ladybird Bioterrorists
Ruth Williams | May 16, 2013 | 3 min read
The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.
Reading Tea Leaves
Jef Akst | Feb 1, 2012 | 3 min read
Cyclic peptides, discovered in an African tea used to speed labor and delivery, may hold potential as drug-stabilizing scaffolds, antibiotics, and anticancer drugs.
The Age-Old Fight Against Antibiotics
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 31, 2011 | 3 min read
Researchers find antibiotic resistance genes in 30,000-year-old bacteria, suggesting such resistance is not a modern phenomenon.
Mining Bacterial Small Molecules
L. Caetano M. Antunes, Julian E. Davies and B. Brett Finlay | Jan 1, 2011 | 10 min read
As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.
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