Illustration of light blue speckled DNA helix on a dark background
Study Nearly Doubles Known Cancer-Linked Mutational Signatures
Analyzing the whole genome sequences of more than 18,000 tumors, researchers catalog nearly 60 new patterns of mutations that could inform cancer treatment.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, KOTO_FEJA
Study Nearly Doubles Known Cancer-Linked Mutational Signatures
Study Nearly Doubles Known Cancer-Linked Mutational Signatures

Analyzing the whole genome sequences of more than 18,000 tumors, researchers catalog nearly 60 new patterns of mutations that could inform cancer treatment.

Analyzing the whole genome sequences of more than 18,000 tumors, researchers catalog nearly 60 new patterns of mutations that could inform cancer treatment.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, KOTO_FEJA

cancer biology

Dark red cancer cells travel through the circulatory system alongside small, brighter-colored red blood cells
Traversing Narrow Channels Helps Metastatic Cancer Cells Survive
Dan Robitzski | Apr 14, 2022
In vitro and mouse experiments show how cancer cells forced through tiny pores—mimicking the physical experience of metastasis—resisted programmed cell death and avoided detection by the immune cells that would normally kill them.
Tiled blue-gray MRI readouts of a human brain.
Cancer Tied to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
Dan Robitzski | Apr 14, 2022
Observational evidence for the connection is solidifying, and some clues are emerging about the mechanisms that may explain it.
Performing Metabolomic and Functional Proteomic Analyses on a Heterogenous Cancer Cell Population
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | Mar 1, 2021
A tumor metabolome panel identifies altered cell states that lead to drug tolerance.
Artist’s rendering of multiple natural killer cells, colored light pink, attacking a purple tumor cell.
Protein Pilfered from Cancer Cells Thwarts Immune Attack
Dan Robitzski | Apr 13, 2022
New research in mice reveals why natural killer cells, normally effective at hunting cancer, are sometimes stopped in their tracks.  
Man in lab coat sitting at a lab bench looking at small, stoppered beaker.
Cancer Researcher Donald Pinkel Dies at Age 95
Natalia Mesa | Mar 18, 2022
Unsatisfied by how treatments for childhood leukemia failed to prevent the disease’s return, Pinkel combined them all—and virtually cured the disease.
Mining Coding Regions with Whole-Exome Sequencing
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Nov 4, 2020
Multiple next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques offer insights into health and disease.
Tumor microbiome composite
Could Cancer’s Microbiome Help Diagnose and Treat the Disease?
Jef Akst | Mar 14, 2022
A growing appreciation of the bacterial assemblages that live within tumors has researchers striving to understand and capitalize on their role.
Illustration showing microbial signatures of cancer in the body
Infographic: Putting Cancer’s Unique Microbiomes to Use
Jef Akst | Mar 14, 2022
From diagnosis to tracking treatment responses, bacteria and other microbes in the blood, gut, and tumors of cancer patients may provide helpful hints for improving their care.
Investigating the Immune Response Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 8, 2020
Discover how researchers are using flow cytometry to delve into the inner workings of the immune life cycle!
Scientific illustration of a migrating breast cancer cell.
Breast Cancer Cells Churn Out Cholesterol to Fuel Metastasis
Alejandra Manjarrez | Feb 4, 2022
A study uncovers a novel connection between the biomolecule and cancer progression.
Salmonella (pink) invading a human epithelial cell (yellow)
Modified Salmonella Revs Immune Response, Combats Tumors in Mice
Natalia Mesa | Feb 3, 2022
When coated with positively charged particles, the bacteria shuttled antigens out of tumors and activated the immune system, a study finds.
Revealing the Complexities of Cancer with Single-cell RNA Analysis
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 19, 2020
Download this eBook to learn how single-cell analysis identifies subpopulations of tumor cells!
Microscopic view of salmonella
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Jan 20, 2022
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Photo of older woman dressed in blue smiling and looking at the camera
Cancer Researcher Beatrice Mintz Dies at 100
Natalia Mesa | Jan 20, 2022
Mintz’s experiments over her six-decade career were foundational to cancer and genetics research.
Advancing Cancer Vaccines
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 3, 2020
Sartorius invites you to join them for an educational webinar.
Neuro collage
Our Favorite Neuroscience Stories of 2021
Chloe Tenn | Dec 29, 2021
From a Nobel prize and photosynthesis-powered brains to neurodegeneration research and controversy over a new Alzheimer’s drug, a look back at some of the biggest brain-related developments of the year.
A compilation of several images, including a dog, a blind mole rat, and cell micrographs
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2021
Amanda Heidt | Dec 9, 2021
This year revealed just how much scientists have learned about the disease, from how animals become naturally cancer-resistant to how tumor cells harness extracellular DNA to develop rapid drug resistance.
Lab dishes containing blue liquid
Study Finds Reproducibility Issues in High-Impact Cancer Papers
Catherine Offord | Dec 7, 2021
Researchers involved in an eight-year project to reproduce the findings of more than 50 high-impact papers struggled to get enough information to even carry out most of the experiments.
An artist's rendition of an RNA molecule in light blue on a dark blue background
Same RNA Acts in Neurodegeneration and Cancer
Abby Olena | Oct 29, 2021
The long noncoding RNA MINCR, implicated in ALS and Alzheimer’s disease as well as several types of cancer, appears to function differently when present at high versus low levels.