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A colored microscopy image of a dividing breast cancer cell
Transfer RNAs Have a Surprising Role in Breast Cancer Growth
A particular leucine-ferrying tRNA is more abundant in cancerous cells than healthy ones, and lowering its levels inhibits cancer growth, a study finds.
Transfer RNAs Have a Surprising Role in Breast Cancer Growth
Transfer RNAs Have a Surprising Role in Breast Cancer Growth

A particular leucine-ferrying tRNA is more abundant in cancerous cells than healthy ones, and lowering its levels inhibits cancer growth, a study finds.

A particular leucine-ferrying tRNA is more abundant in cancerous cells than healthy ones, and lowering its levels inhibits cancer growth, a study finds.

cancer biology
A collection of images from previous neuroscience articles, including those of an octopus in a chamber, artistic renditions of a brain, brain scans, and an image of neural connections in vitro.
Our Favorite Neuroscience Stories of 2022
Dan Robitzski | Dec 28, 2022 | 4 min read
This year, neuroscience researchers made important discoveries related to how neurodegeneration attacks the human brain, hooked cultured neurons up to machinery to teach them to play a video game, and more.
A collection of images from prior stories, including illustrations of DNA, chromosomes, and various cells, microscopy images of cancer cells, and a photo of a mouse on a treadmill.
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2022
Dan Robitzski | Dec 27, 2022 | 4 min read
This year, cancer researchers uncovered a variety of ways that tumors can survive and spread, ranging from damaging their own DNA to exploiting the nearby microenvironment for nutrients.
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Present Your Paper in The Scientist’s Journal Club
The Scientist Staff | 1 min read
Apply today to share your cutting-edge research in The Scientist’s Journal Club.
A fishing cat with a fish in its mouth
Genome Spotlight: Fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus)
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Dec 22, 2022 | 5 min read
A high-quality reference genome for this vulnerable feline may help scientists understand why they’re so prone to transitional cell carcinoma in captivity.
An artist’s rendition of transcription inside a nucleus
Hypertranscription by Tumors Is Linked to Poorer Cancer Outcomes: Study
Sophie Fessl, PhD | Dec 13, 2022 | 3 min read
The extent to which transcription is higher in tumor cells than in surrounding nontumor cells is associated with bad prognoses in several cancer types.
Performing Metabolomic and Functional Proteomic Analyses on a Heterogenous Cancer Cell Population
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | 2 min read
A tumor metabolome panel identifies altered cell states that lead to drug tolerance.
2022 Top 10 Innovations 
2022 Top 10 Innovations
The Scientist Staff | Dec 12, 2022 | 10+ min read
This year’s crop of winning products features many with a clinical focus and others that represent significant advances in sequencing, single-cell analysis, and more.
illustration of cancer cells moving
Cancer Cells Gather Speed in Thicker Fluids
Holly Barker | Nov 22, 2022 | 4 min read
Viscous solutions accelerate the migration of tumor cells and may enable metastasis, according to a new study.
Mining Coding Regions with Whole-Exome Sequencing
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Multiple next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques offer insights into health and disease.
Micrograph image of cancer cells stained violet.
Oral Cancer Survives Starvation with Help from Nearby Nerves
Dan Robitzski | Nov 16, 2022 | 3 min read
Human and mouse oral tumors recruit nerves to produce peptides that the cancer cells need to survive—but this process can be blocked with a migraine drug.
Blue 3D illustration of X-shaped chromosomes
X Chromosome Silenced in Some Cancers in Males
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Nov 11, 2022 | 3 min read
A study finds that XIST, the gene that shuts down one X chromosome in people who have two, is linked to cancer in males. 
Investigating the Immune Response Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Discover how researchers are using flow cytometry to delve into the inner workings of the immune life cycle!
Pink- and purple-stained cells clustered into glands
Phenotypic Variation in Cancer Cells Often Not Due to Mutations
Jef Akst | Oct 26, 2022 | 3 min read
Most differences in gene expression among cells within a tumor are likely due to environment or noise, a study suggests. 
two glowing neuronlike macrophages
Immune Cells Imitating Neurons Cause Pain in Mice with Tumors
Shafaq Zia | Oct 18, 2022 | 3 min read
Whether the finding of a novel mechanism for cancer-related pain can lead to better treatments for neuropathic pain in people remains to be seen.
Revealing the Complexities of Cancer with Single-cell RNA Analysis
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Download this eBook to learn how single-cell analysis identifies subpopulations of tumor cells!
Histological slide showing cancerous prostate tissue
2D Genetic Map of Prostate Cells Charts Cancer Growth
Holly Barker | Aug 23, 2022 | 4 min read
An in situ map of copy number variations in prostate tissue reveals that purportedly cancerous genomic changes frequently occur in the healthy tissue surrounding tumors.
Fluorescent microscopy of a healthy intestinal organoid and a tumor spheroid
Internal Clock Disruptions Increase Colon Cancer Risk in Mice
Shafaq Zia | Aug 19, 2022 | 3 min read
Disturbing circadian rhythms in organoids and mice increases intestinal tumor growth, findings that may explain a recent rise in colon cancer among young adults, the researchers behind the work say.
Advancing Cancer Vaccines
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Sartorius invites you to join them for an educational webinar.
Artist’s rendition of metastatic cancer cells with yellow nuclei and green cell bodies extending into blue tendrils.
While the Body Rests, Breast Cancer Spreads More Aggressively
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jun 23, 2022 | 4 min read
More cancer cells are shed from primary tumors when individuals are asleep than when they’re awake, according to observations in mouse models and a small cohort of breast cancer patients.
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