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Photo of Chantell Evans
Chantell Evans Tracks Mitochondrial Cleanup in Neurons
The Duke University cell biologist uses live-cell microscopy to reveal how brain cells rid themselves of damaged mitochondria and what goes wrong in neurodegenerative disease.
Chantell Evans Tracks Mitochondrial Cleanup in Neurons
Chantell Evans Tracks Mitochondrial Cleanup in Neurons

The Duke University cell biologist uses live-cell microscopy to reveal how brain cells rid themselves of damaged mitochondria and what goes wrong in neurodegenerative disease.

The Duke University cell biologist uses live-cell microscopy to reveal how brain cells rid themselves of damaged mitochondria and what goes wrong in neurodegenerative disease.

mitochondria
illustration of human oocyte
Mammalian Oocytes Store mRNA in Newly Found Membraneless Structure
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Oct 20, 2022 | 3 min read
The findings answer the longstanding question of where these cells hold the mRNA needed to cope with the transcriptional halt preceding meiosis.
illustration of DNA strands
Mitochondrial DNA Sneaks into Nuclear Genome
Holly Barker | Oct 17, 2022 | 3 min read
Genetic material pilfered from mitochondria may seal cracks in our genetic code, a study suggests.
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 16 - At the Breaking Point: Mitochondrial Deletions and the Brain
The Scientist Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Researchers characterize large mitochondrial deletions to understand their implications in neurological disorders.
The structure of a biological cell (macro)
The Long and Winding Road to Eukaryotic Cells
Amanda Heidt | Oct 17, 2022 | 10+ min read
Despite recent advances in the study of eukaryogenesis, much remains unresolved about the origin and evolution of the most complex domain of life.
Illustration showing the path result of Eukaryogenesis
Infographic: Evolutionary Leaps Leading to Modern Eukaryotes
Amanda Heidt | Oct 17, 2022 | 2 min read
A lot happened in the hundreds of millions years separating the first and last eukaryotic common ancestors, but when and how most features arose remains a mystery.
A false color transmission electron microscope micrograph showing the nuclear envelope, the rough endoplasmic reticulum, the nucleus, and the cytoplasm.
New Gene Mutants Identified in Rare Motor Neuron Diseases
Clare Watson | Oct 17, 2022 | 2 min read
The discovery of gene variants in cases of hereditary spastic dysplasia could provide a diagnosis to affected families where no genetic cause could be found before.
Neurons in all sorts of different colors, some glowing
How Fear Restructures the Mouse Brain
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Aug 15, 2022 | 4 min read
By combining deep learning and electron microscopy, researchers now have a more detailed understanding of how fear changes the brain.
dark image with red ring
How Immature Egg Cells in Ovaries Resist Aging
Shafaq Zia | Aug 4, 2022 | 3 min read
The cells’ mitochondria skip a key metabolic reaction that takes place in other cells in the body, a study finds.
An illustration of a mitochondrion, represented by a purple and orange bilayer, synthesizing reddish molecules of ATP.

Mitochondrial Protein Fuels Spread of Head and Neck Cancer 

Patience Asanga | Jul 8, 2022 | 3 min read
Head and neck cancer cells lacking the peptide involved in energy production were less likely to metastasize in mice.
A microscope image of Legionellales bacteria infecting a protozoan
Ancestral Bacteria May Have Invaded Early Eukaryotic Cells
Clare Watson | Jun 1, 2022 | 2 min read
The discovery that a group of cell-infecting bacteria lived roughly 2 billion years ago stirs a longstanding controversy around which came first: phagocytosis or mitochondria.
Illustration of blue shiny mitochondria
Worms Live Longer with Mitochondria Powered by Light: Preprint
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | May 24, 2022 | 4 min read
Increasing mitochondrial activity in worms by engineering a light-activated proton pump into the organelle’s membrane extends the animals’ lifespan without evidence of health decline, according to a preprint.
illustration of purple mitochondrion within a cell
Rogue Mitochondria Turn Hermaphroditic Snails Female: Study
Patience Asanga | May 19, 2022 | 3 min read
The accidental finding marks the first time a phenomenon called cytoplasmic sterility, known to occur in plants, has been found in animals.
illustration of a mitochondrian inside a cell
Could Dad’s Mitochondrial DNA Benefit Hybrids?
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jan 20, 2022 | 7 min read
Studies have found that organisms can inherit mitochondria from male parents in rare instances, and both theoretical and experimental work hint that this biparental inheritance is more than just a fluke.
Close-up of wild sea otter (Enhydra lutris) eating shellfish while floating on it's back.
Sea Otters Demonstrate that There Is More to Muscle than Just Movement—It Can Also Bring the Heat
Traver Wright, Melinda Sheffield-Moore, and Randall Davis | Dec 13, 2021 | 4 min read
Sea otters are born with a supercharged metabolism that helps them stay warm in chilly waters.
False color image of two Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms; blue on a black background
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021 | 3 min read
Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.
How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Infographic: How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021 | 1 min read
Neurons stressed with chemicals produce Wnt, which in turn triggers changes in the germline.
Scanning electron micrograph showing cancer cell attached to T call via nanotube
Cancer Cell Nanotubes Hijack Mitochondria from Immune Sentinels
Sophie Fessl, PhD | Nov 30, 2021 | 3 min read
The mitochondria stolen via these tiny connections give tumor cells a metabolic boost while the T cells are left weakened, according to in vitro experiments.
Photograph of a brown laboratory mouse
Experiment Gone Awry Suggests Novel Way to Combat Hypoxia
Phil Jaekl | Oct 1, 2021 | 4 min read
While exploring suspended animation in mice, scientists discover how an enzyme can protect the brain from dangerously low levels of oxygen.
Mouse heart cells that have taken up adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles (stained red)
Fat Cells Send Mitochondrial Distress Signals to the Heart
Ruth Williams | Aug 20, 2021 | 3 min read
Vesicles containing fragments of the organelles released from stressed adipocytes protect the heart against oxygen deprivation, a study in mice shows.
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