ADVERTISEMENT
A pair of prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster)
Monogamous Rodents Don’t Need “Love Molecule” To Pair Up
Prairie voles lacking functional receptors for oxytocin form normal social bonds, a finding that could explain the hormone’s clinical failures.
Monogamous Rodents Don’t Need “Love Molecule” To Pair Up
Monogamous Rodents Don’t Need “Love Molecule” To Pair Up

Prairie voles lacking functional receptors for oxytocin form normal social bonds, a finding that could explain the hormone’s clinical failures.

Prairie voles lacking functional receptors for oxytocin form normal social bonds, a finding that could explain the hormone’s clinical failures.

News Brief
Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm
Double Agents: Engineered Bacteria Tackle Pathogenic Biofilms in Mice
Katherine Irving | Jan 26, 2023 | 3 min read
Mycoplasma pneumoniae with pathogenic genes replaced by biofilm-degrading ones enhance survival in a mouse model of ventilator-associated pneumonia.
Microscopy image with blue and red neurons, where red indicates neurons involved in a memory engram
Asthma Drug Helps Mice Retrieve Memories “Lost” to Sleep Deprivation
Zunnash Khan | Jan 24, 2023 | 4 min read
A study finds roflumilast can reverse sleep deprivation–induced amnesia in mice, hinting at pathways to treating memory loss in people.
a centrifuge from a birds-eye view, spinning quickly with a colored blur 
Scientists Use Centrifuge to Discover a Hormone
Katherine Irving | Jan 23, 2023 | 3 min read
A new method for isolating extracellular fluid aims to discover molecules with therapeutic potential that were previously obscured by highly abundant proteins.
a newly hatched mosquito sits on top of water, with its discarded cocoon floating below
In Vitro Malaria Sporozoite Production May Lead to Cheaper Vaccines
Katherine Irving | Jan 20, 2023 | 4 min read
A method for culturing the infectious stage of the Plasmodium lifecycle could increase malaria vaccine production efficiency by tenfold, study authors say.
A photo of a dish in which cells, which look like small dots, have been enlarged and stained to make them visible to the naked eye.
New Swelling Technique Makes Cells Visible to the Naked Eye
Kamal Nahas, PhD | Jan 19, 2023 | 4 min read
A new technique, called Unclearing Microscopy, physically inflates and then stains cells to circumvent the need for expensive microscopes.
An artist’s rendering of a DNA-based virus trap, represented as gray rods in a short cone-shaped arrangement. One is coated with blue molecules, likely antibodies, that adhere to a virus target. Another image shows to traps coming together to capture a red coronavirus.
“Origami” DNA Traps Could Keep Large Viruses From Infecting Cells
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 18, 2023 | 4 min read
By engineering structures out of DNA, scientists could potentially prevent larger viruses, like coronaviruses and influenza viruses, from interacting with cells.
A green and white fish swimming underwater
Rockfish Genes Hold Clues to Human Longevity
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 12, 2023 | 3 min read
By analyzing the genomes of 23 remarkably long-lived fish species, a study found two metabolic pathways associated with longevity.
a hand reaches towards a pack of cigarettes
Newly Identified Neural Signature of Drug Craving Could Predict Drug Use
Katherine Irving | Jan 11, 2023 | 4 min read
The signature could one day be used to improve treatment planning for people with substance abuse disorders.
Artist’s rendition of a neuron silhouetted against a glowing red background.
SNO-y Protein Levels Help Explain Why More Women Develop Alzheimer’s
Dan Robitzski | Jan 6, 2023 | 4 min read
Female postmortem brains contain more S-nitrosylated C3 proteins, likely linked to menopause, which instruct immune cells to kill neuronal synapses.
Pink neutrophils on a white background.
Mucus-Eating Gut Bacteria May Promote Fever After Cancer Treatment
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jan 5, 2023 | 3 min read
The expansion of mucus-degraders in the mouse gut—possibly due to poor nutrition—thins the colon’s mucus layer and may weaken defenses against blood-infecting microbes.
Artist’s rendering of a reflective metallic DNA double helix.
Humans Are Still Evolving Thanks to Microgenes
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 4, 2023 | 3 min read
A study sheds light on the tiny genes that have evolved in human genomes since we split from our mammalian ancestors.
Artist’s rendition of two X chromosomes in blue, with a glowing orange line swirling around one.
Male and Female Stem Cells Derived from One Donor in Scientific First
Dan Robitzski | Dec 22, 2022 | 3 min read
Studying otherwise identical XY, XX, X0, and XXY pluripotent stem cells will allow researchers to investigate sex-based differences in greater depth.
A grayscale tomography image of snake tissue
Snakes Have Clitorises After All, Study Finds
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Dec 13, 2022 | 4 min read
Researchers visualize the snake clitoris in detail for the first time, finding evidence that the organ may be evolutionarily important for snake sex.
An artist’s rendition of transcription inside a nucleus
Hypertranscription by Tumors Is Linked to Poorer Cancer Outcomes: Study
Sophie Fessl, PhD | Dec 13, 2022 | 3 min read
The extent to which transcription is higher in tumor cells than in surrounding nontumor cells is associated with bad prognoses in several cancer types.
Illustration of HIV virus
Viral Protein Behind Chronic Inflammation in People with HIV: Study
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Dec 12, 2022 | 3 min read
The HIV protein Nef can cause long-term genetic changes that lead to hyperreactive immune cells, according to research in human cells and mice. 
Image of a culture of <em >Entamoeba gingivalis</em> growing together with bacteria. There are two roundish amoeba cells surrounded by bacilli and other bacterial forms.
Recently Discovered Virus Family Infects a Human Oral Amoeba
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Dec 1, 2022 | 3 min read
Redondoviruses, which have been associated with cases of periodontitis and other diseases, turn out to live inside the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis.
zebrafish in an aquarium
Epigenetics May Remember Ancestors’ Mutations
Holly Barker | Dec 1, 2022 | 4 min read
Parents’ mutations, even if they’re not inherited by offspring, could affect subsequent generations through changes to epigenetic marks, a study finds.
Brown-red ants climb over a pile of white translucent larvae and orange pupae. Some use their mandibles to position the larvae.
Ant Pupae Feed Adults, Larvae with Secreted Liquid 
Viviane Callier | Nov 30, 2022 | 4 min read
The molting fluid of ant pupae functions as “metabolic currency” in the ant colony and may have enabled the evolution of eusociality. 
Lock and key illustration
Novel Yeast-Assembly Technique Yields Living Materials
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Nov 23, 2022 | 3 min read
Researchers say structures made of the cells could potentially be used to clean up uranium from oceans, heal wounds, and more.
ADVERTISEMENT