Archaea
Let There Be Life
Let There Be Life
Mary Beth Aberlin | Mar 1, 2014
How did Earth become biological?
Discovering Archaea, 1977
Discovering Archaea, 1977
Abby Olena | Mar 1, 2014
Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.
Path Finding
Path Finding
Abby Olena | Mar 1, 2014
Biochemistry reveals the missing link in a pathway that archaea and some bacteria use to generate essential compounds.
Bacteria Trade Genes
Bacteria Trade Genes
Abby Olena | Oct 1, 2013
Extremophiles living in Antarctica’s salty Deep Lake exchange genes much more often than previously observed in nature.
Antarctic Lake Teems With Life
Antarctic Lake Teems With Life
Chris Palmer | Jul 9, 2013
DNA and RNA sequences from Lake Vostok below the Antarctic glacier reveal thousands of bacteria species, including some commonly found in fish digestive systems.
Distantly Related Viruses Proliferate Similarly
Distantly Related Viruses Proliferate Similarly
Kate Yandell | Jun 12, 2013
Whether infecting hot spring-dwelling microbes or humans, viruses co-opt the same group of proteins to assemble themselves and break out of cells.
Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes
Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes
Sabrina Richards | Mar 7, 2013
A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.
Speaking of Science
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Feb 1, 2013
February 2013's selection of notable quotes
Evolutionary Biologist Dies
Evolutionary Biologist Dies
Edyta Zielinska | Jan 2, 2013
Carl Woese, the discoverer of the third domain of life, has passed away at age 84.
Conserved Chromatin?
Conserved Chromatin?
Ed Yong | Dec 10, 2012
Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.