Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error
Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error
One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.
Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error
Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error

One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.

One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.

automation
Accelerating qPCR Set-Up with Automated Pipetting
Accelerating qPCR Set-Up with Automated Pipetting
INTEGRA BIOSCIENCE | Jul 23, 2021
How electronic pipettes and pipetting robots can streamline qPCR set-up for faster and more reproducible results
Encouraging Digital Laboratory Management Solutions
Encouraging Digital Laboratory Management Solutions
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Eppendorf | Jul 14, 2021
A cloud-based platform enables researchers to effectively manage their laboratories.
Syrris shines a light on its latest innovation - the Asia Photochemistry Reactor
Syrris shines a light on its latest innovation - the Asia Photochemistry Reactor
Syrris | May 27, 2021
Syrris has joined the photochemistry movement with its new Asia Photochemistry Reactor. The latest addition to the company’s award-winning Asia Flow Chemistry range, the Asia Photochemistry Reactor enables a host of novel photochemistry applications in flow across a variety of sectors – including pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, agrochemicals and fine chemicals, as well as in academic institutions.
Bringing the Internet of Things into the Lab
Bringing the Internet of Things into the Lab
Abby Olena | Jun 1, 2018
The IoT can link up many facets of research—from laboratory equipment to ideas—but scientists must be ready for the questions its implementation could raise.
Picking Out Patterns
Picking Out Patterns
Kelly Rae Chi | May 1, 2017
Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and data.
Eye on the Fly
Eye on the Fly
Sarah C.P. Williams | Jan 1, 2015
Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.
Brains in Action
Brains in Action
The Scientist Staff | Feb 1, 2014
Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.
 
Single Neuron-Imaging Bot
Single Neuron-Imaging Bot
The Scientist Staff | Jan 31, 2014
New technology probes the functional unit of nervous transmission.
Set It and Forget It
Set It and Forget It
Carina Storrs | Mar 1, 2013
A tour of three systems for automating cell culture
Microbiology Goes High-Tech
Jeffrey M. Perkel | Jun 1, 2012
Out with toothpicks and pipettors; in with automation.
The Scientist’s Amanuensis
Peter Murray-Rust and Brian Brooks | Jul 1, 2011
A virtual lab—where all sorts of parameters are monitored and recorded—promises researchers a higher degree of reproducibility.