plagiarism bot robot automation academic publishing rejection science
Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error
One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.
Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error
Journals’ Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error

One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.

One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.

automation

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