Man in personal protective equipment (glasses, gloves, cap, and coat) watching plants go through a piece of machinery.
Canada Approves World’s First Plant-Based COVID-19 Vaccine
Canada has ordered 76 million doses of Covifenz, the main ingredient of which was manufactured in the leaves of a tobacco relative.
ABOVE: Medicago
Canada Approves World’s First Plant-Based COVID-19 Vaccine
Canada Approves World’s First Plant-Based COVID-19 Vaccine

Canada has ordered 76 million doses of Covifenz, the main ingredient of which was manufactured in the leaves of a tobacco relative.

Canada has ordered 76 million doses of Covifenz, the main ingredient of which was manufactured in the leaves of a tobacco relative.

ABOVE: Medicago

biotechnology

Top 10 Innovations 2021
2021 Top 10 Innovations
The Scientist Staff | Dec 1, 2021
The COVID-19 pandemic is still with us. Biomedical innovation has rallied to address that pressing concern while continuing to tackle broader research challenges.
photograph of a woman wearing a face mask embedded with SARS-CoV-2 sensors
Researchers Create Pathogen-Sensing Face Mask
Annie Melchor | Jul 5, 2021
The masks contain freeze-dried, cell-free biosensors, enabling them to detect pathogens including SARS-CoV-2.
Women looks at computer screen in a lab coat and mask
Quest for Research Freedom Fuels African Biotech Boom
Linda Nordling | Jul 1, 2021
Tired of dancing to the tunes of international funders, and doubtful that long-promised national grants will come, a handful of African biomedical scientists have turned to private investors to bankroll their dreams of autonomy in the lab.
Opinion: Europe Is Sinking Biotech—Again
Robert Paarlberg | Feb 1, 2021
Scientifically groundless regulations could undercut the potential of gene-edited crops, much as they have with GMOs.
FDA Clears Genetic Modification in Pigs for Biomedicine and Food
Catherine Offord | Dec 15, 2020
The decision, which concerns the removal of a sugar molecule on the surface of cells in a line of domestic pigs, marks the first time an approval has been granted for both purposes simultaneously.
Image of the Day: Defective Cilia
Amy Schleunes | Apr 7, 2020
Super-resolution imaging identifies abnormalities in the hair-like protrusions on a cell’s surface and may help facilitate earlier detection of primary ciliary dyskinesia.
Image of the Day: Synthetic Scaffolds
Amy Schleunes | Feb 27, 2020
Three-dimensional polymer matrices offer researchers a new representation of the extracellular matrix that can be used to study the growth of cancer cells.
buri recombinetics hornell cow hereford bull polled genetically engineered talens gmo cattle livestock
Genome-Edited Hornless Cows’ Offspring Are Healthy: Study
Kerry Grens | Oct 9, 2019
All six calves inherited the gene for preventing horn growth, but four also got a piece of the plasmid used to introduce the sequence to their dad—complicating regulatory approval.
New Tissue Clearing Methods Offer a Window into the Brain
Andy Tay | Oct 1, 2019
Researchers are developing a variety of approaches for clearing neural tissue to get a better view of the brain’s circuitry.
Timing and Order of Molecular Events Recorded in Live Cells’ DNA
Ruth Williams | Aug 22, 2019
Genetic engineers have co-opted base editing machinery to enable information storage and processing in the DNA of bacterial and mammalian cells.
cryopreservation facility
Immune Cell Bank Bets on Future CAR T Success
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 16, 2019
The company Cell Vault offers to hold consumers’ T cells for later use, but scientists suggest the service would benefit very few users.
Extended Until August 19: Enter Our Top 10 Innovations Contest Today
The Scientist Staff | Aug 12, 2019
Submit your new product by the end of the day Monday to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist's 2019 competition.
LOCKR de novo protein designed to function as a molecular switch
Designer Protein Acts as a Switch for Cellular Circuitry
Nicoletta Lanese | Jul 25, 2019
Unlike biotech tools adapted from nature, the invention was entirely conceived by humans and represents one of the few proteins made from scratch in the lab.
probe alkaline pools
The Hunt for Electrically Active Microbes
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2019
A new portable instrument could help to lure useful bugs in from the wild.
FDA Approves Gene Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Ashley Yeager | May 27, 2019
At $2 million for a single dose, Novartis’s Zolgensma is the most expensive medicine to date, but still less expensive over a lifetime than another approved drug for the rare genetic disease.
two men carry large tusks over a beach
Genesis 2.0 Is a Beautifully Shot, Cautionary Tale About Biotechnology
Shawna Williams | Jan 2, 2019
The documentary weaves together a hunt for mammoth tusks in the Arctic with scenes from the front lines of synthetic biology.
Solar-Powered Yeast Are More Efficient Drug Factories
Ruth Williams | Nov 15, 2018
Researchers have outfitted brewer’s yeast with light-harvesting semiconductors to boost chemical productivity.
Anti-CRISPR Proteins Found that Block Cas12a Nuclease
Ashley Yeager | Sep 6, 2018
Using bioinformatics, two teams of scientists identified inhibitory proteins for Cas9’s relative.
Synthetic Bacteria Help Treat Phenylketonuria in Mice
Diana Kwon | Aug 17, 2018
The genetically engineered probiotic, already in clinical trials, may ease patients’ strict dietary regimes.