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A Nile rat sitting atop fruits
Genome Spotlight: Nile Rat (Avicanthis niloticus)
A reference sequence for this emerging model organism will facilitate research on type 2 diabetes and the health effects of circadian rhythm disruption.
Genome Spotlight: Nile Rat (Avicanthis niloticus)
Genome Spotlight: Nile Rat (Avicanthis niloticus)

A reference sequence for this emerging model organism will facilitate research on type 2 diabetes and the health effects of circadian rhythm disruption.

A reference sequence for this emerging model organism will facilitate research on type 2 diabetes and the health effects of circadian rhythm disruption.

diabetes
Illustration of pink and blue DNA molecules.
Historic Adaptations May Now Make Us Susceptible to Disease
Dan Robitzski | Sep 16, 2022 | 5 min read
Researchers made the find using an algorithm that purportedly distinguishes between mutations that were selected for and those that came along for the ride by coincidence, a feat that has long eluded scientists.
Bright purple and orange lactobacillus bacteria.
How a Specific Gut Bacterium May Cause Type 1 Diabetes
Dan Robitzski | Aug 25, 2022 | 5 min read
A bacterium that produces an insulin-like peptide can give mice type 1 diabetes, and infection with the microbe seems to predict the onset of the disease in humans, a study finds.
Discover the microbiome’s role in diabetes 
A Question of Balance: How the Gut Microbiome Influences Diabetes
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
The presence of beneficial or detrimental microbes pulls the host toward health or disease.
Micrograph of a beta cell, where insulin granules are shown as blue small balls, mitochondria are colored green, and a fraction of the cell nucleus appears in purple.
Diabetes Linked to Malnutrition Is Metabolically Unique: Study
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jun 16, 2022 | 5 min read
Results from a small sample of Indian males suggest that lean individuals with a history of malnutrition suffer from a distinct type of diabetes characterized by a defect in insulin secretion.
Group of cells stained in either blue or green in a black background.
Diabetes Marker Linked to COVID-19 Severity in Mice
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | May 16, 2022 | 3 min read
A sugar that’s less abundant in the blood of people with diabetes binds to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein and disrupts the virus’s ability to fuse with cells.  
VAI
Exposed: Environmental Echoes in Health - A Special Podcast Series
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team and Van Andel Institute | 2 min read
Epigenetic experts discuss how environment and diet leave lasting impressions on the human genome.
hands of a person checking their blood glucose level with a monitor
Growing Evidence Ties COVID-19 to Diabetes Risk
Bianca Nogrady | May 3, 2022 | 7 min read
Studies suggest SARS-CoV-2 infection could trigger the development of diabetes in some people, even those with no other risk factors.
A Northern Bahamian Rock Iguana cranes its neck to eat a grape that’s speared on the end of a stick.
Grape-Doling Tourists Gave Endangered Iguanas High Blood Sugar
Dan Robitzski | Apr 21, 2022 | 3 min read
Research finds that a high-sugar diet supplied by tourists is giving Bahamian rock iguanas the lizard equivalent of high blood sugar.
Peripheral blood mononuclear cells surrounded by red blood cells in circulating blood.
Accelerating Immune Research with Cryopreserved Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team and MilliporeSigma | 3 min read
Commerically-available peripheral blood mononuclear cells offer a well-characterized, accessible, and consistent model for immunology and therapeutic development.
Arthur Riggs smiles for the camera
Geneticist Arthur Riggs Dies at 82
Lisa Winter | Apr 14, 2022 | 2 min read
His research paved the way for the development of synthetic insulin to treat diabetes.
Four white, circular pills balance on their side in front of a pink background.
Metformin Prescriptions Linked to Sons’ Birth Defects
Dan Robitzski | Mar 29, 2022 | 2 min read
A new cohort study finds that boys whose fathers took the type 2 diabetes drug metformin three months before their conception were more likely to have a birth defect.
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on the skin
The Scientist Speaks - Virulence Meets Metabolism: The Unique Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus
Niki Spahich, PhD | 1 min read
Anthony Richardson discusses what makes Staph especially dangerous for people with diabetes.
M. Mueckler looking at the camera in front of his microscope in 1998.
Cellular Biologist Michael Mueckler Dies at 67
Lisa Winter | Aug 18, 2021 | 1 min read
His work centered on the mechanisms of glucose transport into cells.
Fat Tissue Reorganizes During Pregnancy
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2021 | 3 min read
Researchers identify a protein that promotes changes in adipose tissue in vitro and in pregnant mice and may help protect against gestational diabetes in humans.
Cell Culture Advances Fuel Disease Research
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
New twists to an old technique reveal a better understanding of disease pathology and new therapeutic avenues.
Infographic: How Pregnancy Changes Fat Tissue
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2021 | 1 min read
Researchers propose a mechanism by which a protein produced in the placenta may trigger blood vessel growth and enlarge fat cells.
Helen Murray Free smiling at the camera, wearing a red shirt and black jacket with red trim.
Diabetes Testing Pioneer Helen Free Dies at 98
Lisa Winter | May 5, 2021 | 3 min read
Free’s dip-and-read urinalysis allowed diabetics to monitor glucose levels at home, rather than at a hospital.
High Content Phenotypic Screening and Analysis Enhances Drug Discovery
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Molly Shoichet and Bridget Wagner discuss strategies for using phenotypic screening to identify novel agents against diseases such as cancer and diabetes.
a young woman pedals an exercise bike while wearing a mask to monitor oxygen consumption
Extreme Exercise Carries Metabolic Consequences: Study
Shawna Williams | Mar 23, 2021 | 4 min read
Healthy people put through high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, displayed insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction after working out excessively.
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