Nephrologist Barbara Murphy Dies at 56
Nephrologist Barbara Murphy Dies at 56
Her work led to more predictable outcomes for kidney transplants.
Nephrologist Barbara Murphy Dies at 56
Nephrologist Barbara Murphy Dies at 56

Her work led to more predictable outcomes for kidney transplants.

Her work led to more predictable outcomes for kidney transplants.

genetics and genomics
Skin Sheltered from Sunlight Still Gathers UV-Linked Mutations
Skin Sheltered from Sunlight Still Gathers UV-Linked Mutations
Abby Olena | Jan 14, 2021
Whole-genome sequencing reveals a wide range of UV-induced DNA changes in human skin cells, and lighter skin collects more mutations, sometimes to “sky high” levels.
Bryan Sykes, Ancestral Genetics Expert, Dies at 73
Bryan Sykes, Ancestral Genetics Expert, Dies at 73
Lisa Winter | Jan 12, 2021
Sykes sequenced famous ancient remains, such as Ötzi and Cheddar Man, and was one of the first researchers to use mitochondrial DNA to trace genetic lineages.
CRISPR’s Adaptation to Genome Editing Earns Chemistry Nobel
CRISPR’s Adaptation to Genome Editing Earns Chemistry Nobel
Amanda Heidt | Oct 7, 2020
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna reprogrammed the bacterial immune response into one of the most popular tools for genetics and molecular biology.
Native Americans Crossed the Pacific Long Before Europeans
Native Americans Crossed the Pacific Long Before Europeans
Abby Olena | Jul 8, 2020
Genetic evidence points to individuals from South America having possibly floated on a raft to Polynesian islands about 500 years before Europeans navigated there.
Sequences of African Genomes Highlights Long-Overlooked Diversity
Sequences of African Genomes Highlights Long-Overlooked Diversity
Jef Akst | Oct 18, 2019
An analysis of more than 400 human genomes from residents of 13 African countries presented at this week’s annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics greatly expands our species’ cataloged genetic diversity.
Cancer-Specific Antigens Encoded in “Junk” DNA
Cancer-Specific Antigens Encoded in “Junk” DNA
Carolyn Wilke | Apr 1, 2019
Researchers found that allegedly noncoding genetic material carries the instructions for many peptides that may help harness the immune system to fight cancer.
The Dark Matter of the Human Proteome
The Dark Matter of the Human Proteome
Annie Rathore | Apr 1, 2019
Advances in the functional characterization of newly discovered microproteins hint at diverse roles in health and disease.
“Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment
“Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment
Bob Grant | Sep 26, 2016
A trio of genetic studies on seldom-studied indigenous populations points to a single wave of migration as humanity wandered from its evolutionary homeland into the rest of the world.
Inherited Resistance to Cocaine
Inherited Resistance to Cocaine
Ed Yong | Dec 17, 2012
Cocaine-using rat fathers pass epigenetic changes on to their sons that make them resistant to coke addiction.
The Plastic Genome
The Plastic Genome
Beth Marie Mole | Dec 1, 2012
The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.
The Biology of Politics
The Biology of Politics
Dan Cossins | Nov 6, 2012
A number of studies have linked genes and hormones to political attitudes and behaviors, though the evidence remains controversial.
Coming to Terms
Coming to Terms
Anna Ajduk and Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz | Nov 1, 2012
New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.
Creative Emulsification
Creative Emulsification
Sabrina Richards | Nov 1, 2012
Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies
Mapping Genetic Variation
Mapping Genetic Variation
Ed Yong | Oct 30, 2012
The 1000 Genomes Project reveals the most comprehensive catalog to date of variation in the human genome.
Moss Harbors Foreign Genes
Moss Harbors Foreign Genes
Ed Yong | Oct 23, 2012
Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.
Flooding Rivers with Resistance
Flooding Rivers with Resistance
Dan Cossins | Oct 17, 2012
A river system in Colorado contains high concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes in areas close to water-treatment plants.
New Culprit for Parkinson’s?
New Culprit for Parkinson’s?
Dan Cossins | Oct 16, 2012
Scientists use human stem cells to show that nuclear defects may play a role in Parkinson’s disease, and suggest a way to reverse the problem.
Quick Genome Screen for Baby
Quick Genome Screen for Baby
Dan Cossins | Oct 3, 2012
A new streamlined method for sequencing and analysing whole genomes could help physicians quickly diagnose children with genetic diseases.