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three black mice lined up next to each other. the one on the left, fed a low-fat diet, has one small bald patch, the middle mouse, fed fish oil, has a large bald spot across its shoulders and back, and the right mouse, fed cocoa butter, has no baldness.
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds
The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds

The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.

The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.

macrophage
Cross section of an organic cell with intracellular organelles
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.
Illustration showing how some intracellular bacteria, such as <em >Legionella pneumophila</em>, manipulate the cell&#39;s membranes for their own good
Infographic: Intracellular Bacteria’s Tricks for Host Manipulation 
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 2 min read
Various microbes, including several human pathogens, hijack the cell’s skeleton, membranes, and protein-making machinery to make themselves at home.
Salmonella living within macrophages can survive antibiotic treatment and potentially give rise to resistance by two different mechanisms that slow or arrest their growth.
Bacteria Go Dormant to Survive Antibiotics and Restart Infections
Niki Spahich, PhD | 3 min read
In Salmonella, two seemingly similar antibiotic survival strategies result from very different molecular mechanisms.
two glowing neuronlike macrophages
Immune Cells Imitating Neurons Cause Pain in Mice with Tumors
Shafaq Zia | Oct 18, 2022 | 3 min read
Whether the finding of a novel mechanism for cancer-related pain can lead to better treatments for neuropathic pain in people remains to be seen.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of multiple <em>Neisseria gonorrhoeae</em>, the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, depicted as two spheres stuck together, each covered in tendrils.
Gonorrhea-Blocking Mutation Also Protects Against Alzheimer’s: Study
Holly Barker | Aug 5, 2022 | 4 min read
Research traces the evolution of a gene variant that reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, finding that it originally evolved in response to infectious bacteria.
Investigating the Immune Response Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Discover how researchers are using flow cytometry to delve into the inner workings of the immune life cycle!
interstitium interstitial space cancer macrophage human anatomy
Cancer Cells Could Travel Through the Interstitium: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Apr 19, 2021 | 3 min read
The continuous network of fluid-filled compartments crosses organ barriers and might serve as a conduit for tumor cells to spread.
neutrobots, neutrophils, white blood cells, microrobots, nanorobots, microbots, glioma, brain cancer, paclitaxel, magnetic, swarm, mice
Microscopic Robots Deliver Drugs to the Brain
Asher Jones | Mar 30, 2021 | 5 min read
Researchers turned white blood cells called neutrophils into drug-smuggling “neutrobots,” which penetrated the blood-brain barrier to treat brain cancer in mice.
CAR Macrophages Tackle Challenges in Solid Cancer Treatment
Amanda Heidt | Mar 26, 2021 | 6 min read
Following on the success of CAR T cells used to treat cancers of the blood, researchers have launched a Phase 1 clinical trial of genetically modified macrophages to target solid tumors.
Infographic: Envisioning Macrophages
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2021 | 1 min read
Researchers find different distributions of the immune cells in young, older, and diseased eyes.
Macrophages of the Human Eye Come into Focus
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2021 | 3 min read
Imaged in real time in living people, immune cells at the surface of the retina could serve as biomarkers to detect retinal and possibly neurological diseases and track their progression.
A Tweak to Immune Cells Reverses Aging in Mice
Abby Olena, PhD | Jan 20, 2021 | 3 min read
Knocking out the receptor for a lipid that causes inflammation rejuvenates macrophage metabolism and restores cognitive function in an Alzheimer’s disease model.
bradykinin kinin cascade ras covid-19 sars-cov-2 dabk cytokines macrophage edema fluid lung leaky blood vessel
Is a Bradykinin Storm Brewing in COVID-19?
Alakananda Dasgupta | Aug 26, 2020 | 5 min read
Excess of the inflammatory molecule bradykinin may explain the fluid build-up in the lungs of patients with coronavirus infections. Clinical trials of inhibitors are putting this hypothesis to the test.
bradykinin kinin cascade covid-19 sars-cov-2 coronavirus pandemic cytokine macrophage dabk ace2 ace immunology leaky blood vessel inflammation
Infographic: SARS-CoV-2 Interferes with Bradykinin Regulation
Alakananda Dasgupta | Aug 26, 2020 | 1 min read
The leaky blood vessels and lung fluid build-up in some COVID-19 patients might be explained by the virus’s corruption of an inflammation safeguard.
bcg tuberculosis tb sars-cov-2 covid-19 coronavirus pandemic vaccine nonspecific effects trained immunity innate immune system response
An Old TB Vaccine Finds New Life in Coronavirus Trials
Anthony King | May 4, 2020 | 8 min read
Studies are underway to test whether giving a shot of BCG vaccine could protect doctors and nurses against COVID-19.
Image of the Day: Brainless Frogs
Amy Schleunes | Feb 18, 2020 | 1 min read
Without a brain, the frog embryo immune system doesn’t receive the signals it needs to mobilize macrophages and fight infections.
car t chimeric antigen receptor t cell immunotherapy pyroptosis cell death perforin macrophage leukemia lymphoma
Side Effect of CAR T Therapy Caused by Pyroptosis: Mouse Study
Kerry Grens | Jan 20, 2020 | 2 min read
The immunotherapy induces a form of cell death in leukemia cells in mice that triggers cytokine release syndrome, a dangerous inflammatory reaction that occurs in some patients.
Mitochondria Play an Unexpected Role in Killing Bacteria
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 1, 2019 | 3 min read
The energy-producing organelles also send out parcels with antimicrobial compounds to help destroy pathogen invaders in macrophages.
Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer
Amanda B. Keener | Apr 1, 2018 | 10+ min read
Macrophages play numerous roles within tumors, leaving cancer researchers with a choice: eliminate the cells or recruit them.
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