Astrocyte-to-Neuron Method Reverses Neurodegeneration in Mice
Astrocyte-to-Neuron Method Reverses Neurodegeneration in Mice
The cell conversion strategy restores neurons and motor functions lost as a result of an induced Parkinson’s-like illness in the animals.
Astrocyte-to-Neuron Method Reverses Neurodegeneration in Mice
Astrocyte-to-Neuron Method Reverses Neurodegeneration in Mice

The cell conversion strategy restores neurons and motor functions lost as a result of an induced Parkinson’s-like illness in the animals.

The cell conversion strategy restores neurons and motor functions lost as a result of an induced Parkinson’s-like illness in the animals.

Parkinson's disease
Scientific Breakthroughs with Cryogenic Electron Microscopy
Scientific Breakthroughs with Cryogenic Electron Microscopy
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific | Jun 10, 2021
Structures made via cryo-EM give researchers insights into SARS-CoV-2, HIV, neurological disorders, cancer, and more.
How Infectious Diseases Affect the Brain
How Infectious Diseases Affect the Brain
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 8, 2021
From a loss of taste to dementia, infectious agents cause an array of neurological symptoms.
<em>The Scientist&nbsp;</em>Speaks Ep. 16 - At the Breaking Point: Mitochondrial Deletions and the Brain
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 16 - At the Breaking Point: Mitochondrial Deletions and the Brain
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Mar 31, 2021
Researchers characterize large mitochondrial deletions to understand their implications in neurological disorders.
Breaking Down Barriers
Breaking Down Barriers
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 19, 2020
Looking at the future of neurodegeneration research!
RNAi Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Disease Therapy
RNAi Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Disease Therapy
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jun 23, 2020
Experts will explore how RNAi mechanisms can modulate gene expression for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and how new methods for their use are being developed. 
Oleh Hornykiewicz, Who Pioneered Treatment for Parkinson&rsquo;s, Dies
Oleh Hornykiewicz, Who Pioneered Treatment for Parkinson’s, Dies
Amanda Heidt | Jun 18, 2020
The University of Toronto and University of Vienna pharmacologist developed L-dopa, a precursor to dopamine that remains the most widely used therapy for Parkinson’s disease.
A Citizen Scientist Makes Her Mark in Microbiome Research
A Citizen Scientist Makes Her Mark in Microbiome Research
Amy Schleunes | Jun 1, 2020
The BioCollective, a company that transforms whole stool samples into microbial metadata, is developing the US’s first national microbiome reference material.
Into the Light: A Profile of Joanne Chory
Into the Light: A Profile of Joanne Chory
Emily Makowski | Mar 1, 2020
The plant geneticist has revolutionized researchers’ understanding of how light affects plant growth and development, and is engineering plants to combat climate change.
Wanted: Healthy Brains
Wanted: Healthy Brains
Ashley Yeager | Feb 25, 2020
Brain banks have struggled to convince unaffected individuals to donate, hampering studies on “cognitively normal” neurodevelopment and aging.
<em>The Scientist&nbsp;</em>Infographics: Editor&rsquo;s Picks of 2019
The Scientist Infographics: Editor’s Picks of 2019
Jef Akst | Dec 18, 2019
This year’s most beautiful illustrations covered topics including the molecular underpinnings of Parkinson’s disease and strategies for tracking marine organisms around the world’s oceans.
Is It Time to Rethink Parkinson&rsquo;s Pathology?
Is It Time to Rethink Parkinson’s Pathology?
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2019
New evidence points to a waste-clearing problem in patients’ cells, rather than the accumulation of protein tangles, as the root cause of the neurodegenerative disease.
Infographic: Is Cellular Waste at the Root of Parkinson&rsquo;s Disease?
Infographic: Is Cellular Waste at the Root of Parkinson’s Disease?
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2019
Damage to the lysosome, the organelle that removes excess proteins, lipids, and other materials, might be at the root of the disease.
Chemist Christopher Dobson Dies
Chemist Christopher Dobson Dies
Ashley Yeager | Sep 16, 2019
The University of Cambridge scholar’s research on folding proteins advanced scientists’ understanding of illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes.
Chemicals on the Skin Could Enable Parkinson&rsquo;s Detection
Chemicals on the Skin Could Enable Parkinson’s Detection
Shawna Williams | Mar 20, 2019
Researchers teamed up with a woman with a keen sense of smell to identify telling differences between healthy people and those with the neurodegenerative disease.
Can the Flu and Other Viruses Cause Neurodegeneration?
Can the Flu and Other Viruses Cause Neurodegeneration?
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2019
Scientists may need to seriously reconsider the cast-aside hypothesis that pathogens can play a part in diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?
Can Viruses in the Genome Cause Disease?
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 1, 2019
Clinical trials that target human endogenous retroviruses to treat multiple sclerosis, ALS, and other ailments are underway, but many questions remain about how these sequences may disrupt our biology.
Parkinson&rsquo;s Patient Transplanted with Neurons Derived from iPSCs
Parkinson’s Patient Transplanted with Neurons Derived from iPSCs
Ashley P. Taylor | Nov 14, 2018
This is the first time researchers have tested the use of the reprogrammed stem cells in the human brain.
How Exercise Reprograms the Brain
How Exercise Reprograms the Brain
Ashley Yeager | Nov 1, 2018
As researchers unravel the molecular machinery that links exercise and cognition, working out is emerging as a promising neurotherapy.
Parkinson&rsquo;s Disease Enzyme Implicated in More Cases Than Realized
Parkinson’s Disease Enzyme Implicated in More Cases Than Realized
Sukanya Charuchandra | Aug 2, 2018

Levels of active LRRK2 were high even in Parkinson’s patients without a mutation in LRRK2, suggesting that inhibitors of the protein could treat a wider patient population than expected.