sequencing
2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions
2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions
The Scientist Staff | Nov 30, 2016
These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.
Social Media Accelerates Science
Social Media Accelerates Science
Ben Andrew Henry | Nov 1, 2016
How researchers are taking advantage of Twitter and other forums to do, share, and discuss research
Q&A: Sequencing Newborns
Q&A: Sequencing Newborns
Tracy Vence | Oct 21, 2016
Members of the BabySeq Project discuss trial enrollment, preliminary findings.
Q&A: Confirming Next-Gen Sequencing Results with Sanger
Q&A: Confirming Next-Gen Sequencing Results with Sanger
Tracy Vence | Oct 11, 2016
Ambry Genetics CEO Aaron Elliott discusses his team’s recent analysis of 20,000 clinical next-generation sequencing panels.
An Evolutionary History
An Evolutionary History
Mary Beth Aberlin | Oct 1, 2016
Celebrating 30 years and a resurrection
Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations
Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations
Sarah C.P. Williams | Oct 1, 2016
As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.
DNA Sequencing: From Tedious to Automatic
DNA Sequencing: From Tedious to Automatic
Catherine Offord | Oct 1, 2016
Sequencing has gone from a laborious manual task costing thousands of dollars to a quick and cheap practice that is standard for many laboratories.
Thirty Years of Progress
Thirty Years of Progress
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2016
Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.
Genome Digest
Genome Digest
Alison F. Takemura | Sep 1, 2016
What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes
US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man
US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man
Bob Grant | Apr 29, 2016
A 2015 ancient DNA study determined that the 8,500-year-old skeletal remains belonged to an individual of Native American ancestry. Now, the US Army Corp of Engineers has begun the process of returning the bones to their rightful owners.