artistic representation of a jumping gene
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study

Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 

Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 

neurodegeneration
LAKSAMEE CAVE
Clinton Cave Investigates How Brain Cells Communicate
Andy Carstens | Sep 1, 2022
The Middlebury College neuroscientist explores enzymes that affect brain cell development and neurodegeneration.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of multiple <em>Neisseria gonorrhoeae</em>, the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, depicted as two spheres stuck together, each covered in tendrils.
Gonorrhea-Blocking Mutation Also Protects Against Alzheimer’s: Study
Holly Barker | Aug 5, 2022
Research traces the evolution of a gene variant that reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, finding that it originally evolved in response to infectious bacteria.
An abstract stained-glass portrait of a woman with an image of an eye representing the brain
Through the Looking Glass: Aging, Inflammation, and Gut Rejuvenation
Iris Kulbatski, PhD
Renewing the aging gut microbiome holds promise for preventing inflammatory brain and eye degeneration.
Infographic showing how neurodegenerative diseases have long been associated with aggregations of apparently toxic proteins
Infographic: Secret Lives of Neurodegeneration-Linked Proteins
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2022
Maligned peptides such as the Alzheimer’s-associated amyloid precursor protein may have critical roles in the healthy brain.
Amyloid plaques on axons of neurons
The Misunderstood Proteins of Neurodegeneration
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2022
The normal functions of peptides that aggregate in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s have been largely overlooked by scientists, but some argue that they are critical for understanding the development of disease.
A person holding a section of his face and looking in to his brain through a magnifying glass stock illustration
Science Philosophy in a Flash - A Look at Aging Through Young Eyes 
Iris Kulbatski, PhD
Aimée Parker shares how her childlike curiosity and collaborative spirit motivate her scientific pursuits.
Tiled blue-gray MRI readouts of a human brain.
Cancer Tied to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
Dan Robitzski | Apr 14, 2022
Observational evidence for the connection is solidifying, and some clues are emerging about the mechanisms that may explain it.
Bespectacled man wearing black shirt with arms folded looks at camera in front of lab cabinet
Neuropathologist John Trojanowski Dies at 75
Lisa Winter | Mar 18, 2022
His work was pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
Motor neurons, undergoing degeneration in ALS
Mutant T Cells That Drive Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Progression May React To a Brain Antigen
Nele Haelterman, PhD
Scientists discovered a possibly autoreactive T cell population that forecasts and supports disease progression.
Image of brain cells showing pyramidal neurons in green, astrocytes in red, and microglia in blue
Replacing Microglia Treats Neurodegenerative Disease in Mice
Shawna Williams | Mar 17, 2022
Researchers find a way to wipe out the brain’s immune cell corps and send in new and improved versions.
Epstein-Barr virus EBV, a herpes virus which causes infectious mononucleosis and Burkitt's lymphoma isolated on black background. 3D illustration
Epstein-Barr Virus Causes Multiple Sclerosis: Study
Christie Wilcox | Jan 13, 2022
Experts say new research provides strong evidence that a common herpesvirus can trigger the chronic inflammatory disease.
Learn about hot topics in organoid research
Next-Level Organoids
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Researchers use organoid cultures in unique ways to study health and disease.
Neuro collage
Our Favorite Neuroscience Stories of 2021
Chloe Tenn | Dec 29, 2021
From a Nobel prize and photosynthesis-powered brains to neurodegeneration research and controversy over a new Alzheimer’s drug, a look back at some of the biggest brain-related developments of the year.
A grid of images showing different cross sections of a human brain MRI.
Study Links Flu to Increased Parkinson’s Risk a Decade Later
Dan Robitzski | Nov 19, 2021
Epidemiological research suggests that a flu diagnosis might be one factor in the eventual onset of the neurodegenerative disease, but experts say it doesn’t prove a causal relationship.
Raising the Bar for Biomarkers and Early Diagnostics in Neurodegenerative Disease
Raising the Bar for Biomarkers and Early Diagnostics in Neurodegenerative Disease
Fortis Life Sciences
Identifying novel biomarkers of Parkinson’s disease enables early diagnosis and treatment monitoring.
An artist's rendition of an RNA molecule in light blue on a dark blue background
Same RNA Acts in Neurodegeneration and Cancer
Abby Olena | Oct 29, 2021
The long noncoding RNA MINCR, implicated in ALS and Alzheimer’s disease as well as several types of cancer, appears to function differently when present at high versus low levels.
Illustration of neurons in white with myelin in blue
Repurposed Drug Reverses Signs of Alzheimer’s in Mice, Human Cells
Jef Akst | Oct 12, 2021
Researchers say they hope to launch a clinical trial to test bumetanide, a diuretic approved in 2002, but how it might improve neural functioning is unclear.
Visualize Transcript Location with Spatial Biology Techniques
Unraveling the Cellular and Subcellular Landscape Using Spatial Biology
The Scientist Creative Services Team and Resolve Biosciences
How to visualize gene expression patterns in situ
Colored artistic rendition of neurons and plaque buildup
Alzheimer’s Risk Gene Paradoxically Protects Against Memory Loss
Chloe Tenn | Oct 8, 2021
A new study links a variant of the apolipoprotein E gene called APOE ε4 to better memory in older age, even in the presence of amyloid plaques—a possible explanation for the variant’s persistence despite its association with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.