What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?
What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?
Several labs have reported the formation of bacterial nanotubes under different, often contrasting conditions. What are these structures and why are they so hard to reproduce?
What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?
What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?

Several labs have reported the formation of bacterial nanotubes under different, often contrasting conditions. What are these structures and why are they so hard to reproduce?

Several labs have reported the formation of bacterial nanotubes under different, often contrasting conditions. What are these structures and why are they so hard to reproduce?

cell & molecular biology
Blind Patient Recovers Partial Vision with Optogenetics
Blind Patient Recovers Partial Vision with Optogenetics
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 24, 2021
After receiving an intraocular injection of the gene for a light-sensitive protein, a 58-year-old man diagnosed with the neurodegenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa was able to locate objects on a table using engineered goggles.
Coronavirus Mutations Could Muddle COVID-19 PCR Tests
Coronavirus Mutations Could Muddle COVID-19 PCR Tests
Jack J. Lee | May 17, 2021
Researchers find that SARS-CoV-2 variants can evade primer-probe sets and recommend that diagnostic assays include multiple targets for reliability.
Comprehensive Atlas of Reef-Building Coral’s Cells Created
Comprehensive Atlas of Reef-Building Coral’s Cells Created
Christie Wilcox | May 13, 2021
Single-cell RNA sequencing helps to catalog the dozens of cell types present in a stony coral, including its elusive immune cells.
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
Amanda Heidt | May 13, 2021
While regeneration has long been the domain of colonial tunicates, a solitary species of sea squirt was able to regenerate into multiple, fully functional individuals within a month of being cut up.
Cancer Cells Parasitize Other Ones to Survive: Study
Cancer Cells Parasitize Other Ones to Survive: Study
Marcus A. Banks | May 13, 2021
Tumor cells missing a critical protein enter neighboring cells to sap their nutrients, then exit those hosts as intact cells, possibly primed to metastasize. Other scholars say it’s too early to know this for sure.
Can Single Cells Learn?
Can Single Cells Learn?
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
A controversial idea from the mid-20th century is attracting renewed attention from researchers developing theories for how cognition arises with or without a brain.
Aphid Salivary Gene May Regulate Gall Color
Aphid Salivary Gene May Regulate Gall Color
Asher Jones | May 1, 2021
Whether the galls that aphids make on witch hazel leaves are red or green is associated with a gene expressed in the insects’ salivary glands.
Infographic: Investigating Whether Single Cells Learn
Infographic: Investigating Whether Single Cells Learn
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
Historical and modern experiments have hinted that unicelluar organisms can learn from their experiences, but the idea still has its critics.
No Proof COVID-19 Vaccine Affects Menstruation or Fertility
No Proof COVID-19 Vaccine Affects Menstruation or Fertility
Lisa Winter | Apr 27, 2021
Following vaccination, some women claim their periods have changed, leading to rumors about how the shots affect recipients’ reproductive systems, and even others’ by proxy.  
Laurence “Larry” Kedes, Molecular Geneticist, Dies at 83
Laurence “Larry” Kedes, Molecular Geneticist, Dies at 83
Amanda Heidt | Apr 26, 2021
In addition to isolating the first protein-coding gene from a eukaryote, Kedes furthered scientists’ understanding of actin genes and also laid the foundations for modern DNA databases such as GenBank.
3D Bead-Beating Technology Improves Homogenization
3D Bead-Beating Technology Improves Homogenization
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 20, 2021
Optimizing sample preparation quality and efficiency
Using Multicolor Flow Cytometry for COVID-19 Research
Using Multicolor Flow Cytometry for COVID-19 Research
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 8, 2021
Designing multicolor flow cytometry panels to characterize immunological changes observed in COVID-19 patients.
Mysterious Immune Cells Change the Gut Lining to Accommodate Diet
Mysterious Immune Cells Change the Gut Lining to Accommodate Diet
Stephanie Melchor | Apr 6, 2021
A study shows gamma-delta T cells in mice respond to shifts in nutrients by changing the cellular composition of the intestinal epithelium.
Robert “Buzz” Baldwin, Early Expert in Protein Structures, Dies
Robert “Buzz” Baldwin, Early Expert in Protein Structures, Dies
Jef Akst | Apr 2, 2021
Research by the Stanford University School of Medicine professor revealed how newly formed strings of amino acids fold into complex three-dimensional shapes.
High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
Jef Akst | Apr 1, 2021
Corticosterone interferes with signaling in the skin that normally activates hair follicle stem cells, possibly explaining the link between stress and hair loss.
A Guide to Immunofluorescence Staining
A Guide to Immunofluorescence Staining
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 1, 2021
How to optimize immunofluorescence staining for best results.
Cancer May Be Driven by DNA Outside of Chromosomes
Cancer May Be Driven by DNA Outside of Chromosomes
Paul Mischel | Apr 1, 2021
In the last decade, researchers have come to realize that tumors harbor bits of extrachromosomal DNA that can drive malignancy.
Contributors
Contributors
Asher Jones, Kerry Grens | Apr 1, 2021
Meet some of the people featured in the April 2021 issue of The Scientist.
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
Asher Jones | Apr 1, 2021
A mutant protein called Siglec-XII may promote carcinoma progression in humans, but inactivation of its gene seems to avoid the problem, according to a study.