Squiggly green cilia on blue human pancreatic beta cells
Pancreatic Cell Cilia Wiggle to Control Insulin Release
Tiny hairlike structures on pancreatic cells have long been considered static sensors. Now, researchers say they move and help regulate insulin secretion.
Pancreatic Cell Cilia Wiggle to Control Insulin Release
Pancreatic Cell Cilia Wiggle to Control Insulin Release

Tiny hairlike structures on pancreatic cells have long been considered static sensors. Now, researchers say they move and help regulate insulin secretion.

Tiny hairlike structures on pancreatic cells have long been considered static sensors. Now, researchers say they move and help regulate insulin secretion.

cell & molecular biology
a false color transmission electron microscope image of a neuronal cell body, with lysosomes colored dark green
Scientists Uncover Major Pathway Cells Use to Mend Leaky Lysosomes
Holly Barker | Oct 6, 2022
Damaged lysosomes are repaired by a lipid-based signaling pathway dubbed PITT that could be targeted to treat neurodegenerative disease, its discoverers say.
Fluorescent cells in culture connected by tunneling nanotubules
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain
Natalia Mesa | Jul 21, 2022
Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.
The advantages of 3-D cell culture
The Advantages of 3-D Cell Culture
MilliporeSigma
3-D cell culture narrows the gap between in vitro and in vivo.
Single filament of a bacterium<br><br>
The Naked Eye Can Spy This Enormous Bacterium
Andy Carstens | Jun 24, 2022
At about 2 centimeters in length, Thiomargarita magnifica tests scientists’ notions of how large microbes can grow.
Image of an abstract fractal blue and green sea shell.
Cell Chirality Offers Clues to the Mystery of Body Asymmetry
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers explore the idea that molecular patterns in individual cells could underlie the development of a left and a right in animals.
Why might cells die or fail to thrive in culture?
Why Might Cells Die or Fail to Thrive in Culture?
MilliporeSigma
Learn more about cell culture best practices.
Illustration of fibers in a cell twisting
Infographic: The Emergence of Chirality in the Cell Cytoskeleton
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers use imaging to show how actin fibers tilt and then swirl to create left-right asymmetry in the cell.
A micrograph of the prion-like state of a protein called Pus4
Protein Mediates Non-Genetic Inheritance of Growth Strategies
Catherine Offord | Jan 4, 2022
An RNA-modifying enzyme passed to daughter cells during budding allows yeast cells to switch between faster- and slower-growing phenotypes.
Peering into the Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Researchers visualize the beautiful inner world of cells!
Collage of those featured in the article
Remembering Those We Lost in 2021
Lisa Winter | Dec 23, 2021
As the year draws to a close, we look back on researchers we bid farewell to, and the contributions they made to their respective fields.
Collage of images including sperm, bacteria, coral, and an illustration of a researcher
Our Favorite Cell and Molecular Biology Stories of 2021
Jef Akst | Dec 2, 2021
Beyond The Scientist’s coverage of COVID-19’s molecular underpinnings were many other stories highlighting the advances made in scientists’ understanding of the biology of cells.
Modern Approaches to qPCR
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Download this ebook to learn how updated qPCR instruments provide optimal thermal performance and data connectivity!
False color image of two Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms; blue on a black background
Mitochondrial Stress Is Passed Between Generations
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021
Researchers identified a novel mechanism by which chemically induced stress is “remembered” by the mitochondria of worms more than 50 generations after the original trigger.
MUSCLE CONTROL: Researchers pinpoint how C. elegans (pictured) manages to expel food from its mouth.
The Science Behind How Roundworms Spit
Diana Kwon | Dec 1, 2021
By viewing countless hours of expectorating worms, researchers discover a unique way in which neurons control the movement of muscles.
Gene Therapy Workflow from Production to Quality Control
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Learn about some instruments used in gene therapy production.
3D illustration of a tapeworm infestation in a human intestine
Return of the Worms
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2021
Immunologists and parasitologists are working to revive the idea that helminths, and more specifically the molecules they secrete, could help treat allergies and autoimmune disease.
December 2021 - Gut Guests - Infographic
Infographic: How Worms that Reside in the Gut Could Influence Health
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2021
Research in animals and people supports a range of mechanisms by which the parasites affect physiology and immune responses.
Investigating the Immune Response Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Discover how researchers are using flow cytometry to delve into the inner workings of the immune life cycle!
How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Infographic: How C. elegans Transmit Stress Signals to Offspring
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2021
Neurons stressed with chemicals produce Wnt, which in turn triggers changes in the germline.