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Microscopy view of cancerous human cervix cells stained violet.
Why Some HPV Infections Carry More Cervical Cancer Risk
Where and how human papillomavirus integrates itself into the human genome steers the infection’s clinical outcomes, finds a large, multifaceted study.
Why Some HPV Infections Carry More Cervical Cancer Risk
Why Some HPV Infections Carry More Cervical Cancer Risk

Where and how human papillomavirus integrates itself into the human genome steers the infection’s clinical outcomes, finds a large, multifaceted study.

Where and how human papillomavirus integrates itself into the human genome steers the infection’s clinical outcomes, finds a large, multifaceted study.

DNA sequencing
A fishing cat with a fish in its mouth
Genome Spotlight: Fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus)
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Dec 22, 2022 | 5 min read
A high-quality reference genome for this vulnerable feline may help scientists understand why they’re so prone to transitional cell carcinoma in captivity.
2022 Top 10 Innovations 
2022 Top 10 Innovations
The Scientist Staff | Dec 12, 2022 | 10+ min read
This year’s crop of winning products features many with a clinical focus and others that represent significant advances in sequencing, single-cell analysis, and more.
Scaling BAC on Time and Sample
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Agilent Technologies | 3 min read
A new and simplified quality control method confirms the cloning of both small and large inserts in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) with significantly less time and sample.
Pink- and purple-stained cells clustered into glands
Phenotypic Variation in Cancer Cells Often Not Due to Mutations
Jef Akst | Oct 26, 2022 | 3 min read
Most differences in gene expression among cells within a tumor are likely due to environment or noise, a study suggests. 
Illustration showing assembly Versus Alignment
Infographic: The Sequencing and Assembly of the Human Genome
Brianna Chrisman and Jordan Eizenga | Sep 1, 2022 | 5 min read
With ever-advancing genetic technologies, researchers continue to document the genetic code of the human species.
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 16 - At the Breaking Point: Mitochondrial Deletions and the Brain
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Researchers characterize large mitochondrial deletions to understand their implications in neurological disorders.
Illustration showing a puzzle piece of DNA being removed
Large Scientific Collaborations Aim to Complete Human Genome
Brianna Chrisman and Jordan Eizenga | Sep 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Thirty years out from the start of the Human Genome Project, researchers have finally finished sequencing the full 3 billion bases of a person’s genetic code. But even a complete reference genome has its shortcomings.
Illustration of a DNA virus sneaking genetic material into a host’s nucleus
Infographic: Possible Mechanisms of Gene Transfer in Eukaryotes
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Jul 5, 2022 | 6 min read
Genetic studies have made it clear that eukaryotic horizontal gene transfer can and does happen. Exactly how, though, remains speculative.
One Size Does Not Fit All: Pharmacogenomics in Precision Medicine
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Sandosh Padmanabhan and Andrew Morrow will discuss how pharmacogenomics methods improve precision medicine for cardiovascular disease treatment.
Landscape illustration
Horizontal Gene Transfer Happens More Often Than Anyone Thought
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Jul 5, 2022 | 10+ min read
DNA passed to and from all kinds of organisms, even across kingdoms, has helped shape the tree of life, to a large and undisputed degree in microbes and also unexpectedly in multicellular fungi, plants, and animals.
Illustration of light blue speckled DNA helix on a dark background
Study Nearly Doubles Known Cancer-Linked Mutational Signatures
Jef Akst | Apr 22, 2022 | 2 min read
Analyzing the whole genome sequences of more than 18,000 tumors, researchers catalog nearly 60 new patterns of mutations that could inform cancer treatment.
Advances in Nucleic Acid Sequencing
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Download this eBook to learn how new sequencing methods revolutionize genetics research!
Blue-toned illustration of the DNA double helix, with additional DNA strands in the background
Nearly Complete Human Genome Sequenced
Jef Akst | Jun 8, 2021 | 2 min read
In a preprint, researchers fill in some of the holes left in the first draft of the human genetic code, published at the turn of the century.
Q&A: George Church’s Genome Up for Auction
Jef Akst | Apr 19, 2021 | 5 min read
A founder of the field of synthetic biology is selling data from his own DNA as a nonfungible token, or NFT, through Nebula Genomics, a personal genome company he cofounded.
Bryan Sykes, Ancestral Genetics Expert, Dies at 73
Lisa Winter | Jan 12, 2021 | 3 min read
Sykes sequenced famous ancient remains, such as Ötzi and Cheddar Man, and was one of the first researchers to use mitochondrial DNA to trace genetic lineages.
Y Chromosome from Early Modern Humans Replaced Neanderthal Y
Jef Akst | Sep 24, 2020 | 5 min read
A selective advantage may have led the modern human Y chromosome to sweep through the Neanderthal population after it was introduced via interbreeding more than 100,000 years ago.
Gene Splicing Pioneer Dale Kaiser Dies
Ashley Yeager | Jun 29, 2020 | 5 min read
Working with a virus that infects bacteria, the Stanford University biochemist and developmental biologist helped to develop a way to stitch DNA together, a discovery that gave rise to genetic engineering.
Joachim Messing in a greenhouse with corn
Joachim Messing, Developer of Shotgun Sequencing, Dies
Shawna Williams | Oct 1, 2019 | 2 min read
In addition to his work on widely-used techniques, the researcher was known for engineering crop plants.
Ancient Genomes Reveal Clues About Native Americans’ Past
Jef Akst | Jun 6, 2019 | 2 min read
Sequences from dozens of ancient remains from Siberia reveal the closest ancient relative of Native Americans found outside of North America.
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